Kerby MeyersStrategic thinker and communicator, author
Bio

Differentiation consultant: How do you stand out? Does your messaging reflect your uniqueness? How are your vision and your business aligned? How do your ideas resonate in the marketplace? I've worked with dozens of founders and I'm the author of "Persistent Grit: Candid insights into the startup journey." #persistentgrit



Recent Answers


Hello:
Congrats on entering the go-to-market phase. I’m sure it’s taken a lot to get to this point.
Here’s the rub with this step – it’s all about selling (after your marketing has refined your approach).
In addition to the suggestions above, I highly recommend that you go old school and do some cold calling. Reach out to individual buyers at each casino shop with a strategy that includes a phone call (the vast majority you’ll leave a message) and follow-up emails/calls. Then, explore other market niches and repeat the process.
Cold calling is not fun (unless you’re wired for it) and it is a numbers game, but it can pay off in present deals and in the future (I’ve had people call me back three years later).
Good luck and please let me know if you need more assistance – I’ve trimmed my rate in response to the current global uncertainties.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hello:
It’s certainly a challenging time to work through for any business owner. And a critical time to be flexible in your business.
Some good suggestions here already but I would add that it’s a great time to look outward as well. What do your customers value through good and bad times? How can you better serve them when times are tight (and getting tighter)?
Talk to them (without selling) and learn where they’re cutting and where they’re not. They may clue you into an offering that you haven’t traditionally done, but you can make it happen if there’s demand. Or, double down on something that has steady demand.
Good luck and please let me know if you need more assistance – I’ve trimmed my rate in response to the current global uncertainties.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
I agree with Chalmers that a lead magnet must tie directly to your offering.
Additionally, testing and measuring is an essential part of any marketing effort.
So develop three or four different messages, try each one with different segments of your target audience and monitor the response.
If one generates a lot of interest, consider building out an effort around that appeal.
If one generates a lackluster response, then cut it. You can consider reworking it for a future effort, but for now, focus on the one(s) that work.
Good luck and please let me know if you need more assistance – I’ve trimmed my rate in response to the current global uncertainties.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
It sounds like you're listed on Clarity?
If that's the case, yes, you must do your own marketing to attract potential connections.
If you're trying to generate interest outside of this platform, I would point people to your Clarity Answers page. That will reflect your expertise fairly well.
Good luck and please let me know if you need more assistance – I’ve trimmed my rate in response to the current global uncertainties.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
Assaf makes some good points and I would add:
* Assuming you’ve identified your target market, determine the best places to connect with your ideal client. It could be online, it could be in person or it could be some place completely different.
* Be prepared to demonstrate your expertise by doing, not telling. That could mean running a quick assessment or meeting for an hour and discussing their pains and challenges in order to identify their needs.
Good luck and please let me know if you need more assistance – I’ve trimmed my rate in response to the current global uncertainties.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hello:
Yes, your idea is relatively easy to understand, but execution will indeed be challenging.
On the consultant side, what can you offer outside of lucrative engagements? Have you built this business around a purpose? Are there intangibles that will not only attract top talent but retain it?
On the client side, what does your marketplace offer that no other does? If you address a well-identified niche, you are more likely to become essential to these clients. Also, how are you structuring your offerings? Are they accessible to all types of clients?
Please let me know if you’d like to discuss further.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
Now that you have some experience under your belt, you know what you like and don't like about a relationship with an accountant. You also know more questions to ask before you start your next engagement, such as:
* What do you base your fees on?
* What do you provide on a monthly basis for your standard fee? On a quarterly basis? On an annual basis?
* How often do we review the contract?
* How much extra is doing the book keeping?
* How do you help ease the money management pains of running my business?
Once you've found an accountant who answers such questions to your satisfaction and determined what rate you'll be paying monthly, assess the time the accountant will work on your business, calculate the hourly and compare that to your hourly. If you're comfortable with that difference and with the fact that a professional will be overseeing your finances, then it makes sense to sign on with him or her.
If you wish to discuss, send me a PM through Clarity for 15 free minutes.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
Your rationale here is decent, but you run the risk of trampling all over copyright issues. And ending up in a legal soup as a result.
Giving credit does not absolve you of profiting off someone else's creation. And just because it's available for free doesn't mean there's no copyright protection.
Sorry.
Given all of that, consider a pivot for your business idea that involves working with the creators of these videos and podcasts to generate transcripts.
If you wish to discuss, send me a PM through Clarity for 15 free minutes.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hi:
Not sure how well you know the market you're targeting, but to best know what you need in a partner, get a strong handle on what the target market needs.
Who is your ideal customer? What pain points does she or he have? What is your solution to those pain points? Is it unique (so you need to educate)? Or is it a variation on an existing solution?
Once you have a handle on that and you validate it with potential customers, ask how their current providers handle the relationship. Dig into those likely competitors and learn what you can about their business models. What are their commissions based on? How do they manage the business while conducting business development? What's the most valuable aspect of the business?
If you wish to discuss, send me a PM through Clarity for 15 free minutes.
Cheers,
Kerby


Hello:
Great point to ponder, especially as you're eying raising money.
Assaf offers some excellent advice which I would complement with:
* being realistic about the amount you're raising, the venue for the fundraising and your company's niche in the marketplace is essential for keeping perspective
* raising money is a full-time job -- if you do not commit the time, your efforts will falter
* a concise, well-constructed pitch helps get to a quicker "no," which can be just as valuable as a drawn-out "maybe."
If you wish to discuss, send me a PM through Clarity for 15 free minutes.
Cheers,
Kerby


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