Questions

Can a convicted felon start a business and win government contracts legally?

My last felony conviction was 2016 But I have several

3answers

No, unlikely any customers will trust you with their money. Better to get a worker job, go back to college or grad school, and/or learn a trade, where your conviction will not matter.


Answered 2 years ago

In general, convicted felons can start a business and are not prohibited from bidding on or winning government contracts. However, there are certain limitations and restrictions that may apply.

For example, certain government contracts may require that the business owner and all employees pass a background check or meet certain qualifications, such as having a certain level of education or experience. Additionally, some government agencies may have specific regulations or guidelines that restrict or limit the ability of convicted felons to bid on or win contracts.

Furthermore, certain types of felony convictions may make it difficult for a business owner to win government contracts. For example, if the conviction is related to fraud, embezzlement, or other financial crimes, the business owner may be disqualified from bidding on contracts that involve financial transactions.

It's important to note that each case is unique, and the ability of a convicted felon to win government contracts will depend on the specific circumstances of their case, the type of contract they are bidding on, and other factors. It's always a good idea to consult with an attorney who specializes in government contracts and procurement to understand the rules and regulations that apply to your specific situation.


Answered a year ago

I have helped many business owners with legal issues start a business. They have successfully competed for and won government contracts. The simple answer to your question is yes. Your felony conviction will not prevent you from starting a business or winning government contracts. The biggest issue you will have is if there is a need for a security clearance on the contract. City, county, and state contracts would be easier than federal. If needed, we can schedule a follow-up call to discuss further.


Answered 4 months ago

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