Questions

If it was your first day doing online work what would be your first step?

highly interested! please leave comments on your personal experience and if you could do something different now as your first step what would it be!

5answers

Get Oriented with Your Workspace:
Technical Setup: Ensure your computer meets the job requirements. Check your internet connection is stable and secure. Download any necessary software or communication platforms.

Dedicated Workspace: If possible, create a dedicated workspace to minimize distractions. This could be a spare room, a corner of your living area, or even just a specific table.

Familiarize Yourself with the Company and Role:
Company Culture: Research the company online to get a sense of their culture and values. This will help you feel more comfortable and understand their expectations.

Job Description Review: Carefully re-read your job description. Identify key tasks, deliverables, and communication channels.

Training Materials: If provided, thoroughly review any training materials, guides, or tutorials to get a head start on your responsibilities.

Connect with Your Team:
Introduce Yourself: If possible, reach out to your colleagues via email or chat platforms. Briefly introduce yourself and express your excitement to be on the team.

Schedule Meetings: If there are opportunities for introductions or team meetings, attend them actively.

Identify Your Point of Contact: Determine who you should reach out to with any questions or clarifications. This might be your manager, a designated mentor, or a specific team member.

Start with Smaller Tasks:
Prioritize: Many online roles involve juggling different tasks. Look for a to-do list or project management system to understand your priorities for the day.

Start Simple: Ask your manager or point of contact for a clear first task to get your feet wet and demonstrate your understanding.

These steps will help you feel prepared and confident on your first day of online work.

Do you have any specific questions about online work or your new role? I'd be happy to help further, or you can request a call with me to discuss your online work journey in more detail.


Answered 24 days ago

Si c'était mon premier jour de travail en ligne, ma première étape serait de me familiariser avec la plateforme ou le site sur lequel je vais travailler. Cela inclurait la lecture des directives, des règles et des politiques de la plateforme, ainsi que la compréhension de la manière dont je peux maximiser mes opportunités de réussite. Je prendrais également le temps de découvrir les fonctionnalités de la plateforme, comme la manière de postuler pour des emplois, de soumettre des projets ou de communiquer avec les clients.

Une expérience personnelle que je pourrais partager est lorsque j'ai commencé à travailler en tant que rédacteur indépendant sur une plateforme de freelancing. Ma première étape a été de lire attentivement les guides pour les freelancers fournis par la plateforme. Ensuite, j'ai consacré du temps à créer un profil attrayant et professionnel, en mettant en avant mes compétences, mon expérience et mes réalisations pertinentes. Une fois mon profil prêt, j'ai commencé à explorer les différents projets disponibles et à postuler à ceux qui correspondaient à mes compétences et à mes intérêts.

Si je devais choisir quelque chose de différent maintenant comme première étape, je pourrais envisager de me connecter avec d'autres professionnels du secteur en ligne. Cela pourrait se faire en rejoignant des groupes ou des communautés liés à mon domaine d'activité sur les réseaux sociaux ou en participant à des forums de discussion. Interagir avec d'autres professionnels pourrait me permettre de bénéficier de leurs conseils, de partager des expériences et d'établir des connexions précieuses qui pourraient m'aider à réussir dans mon travail en ligne.


Answered 21 days ago

If it were my first online job, I would likely be a virtual assistant or a chatbot, utilizing my language processing abilities to assist customers or users with various inquiries and tasks. My capabilities would include:

1. Answering questions and providing information on a wide range of topics.
2. Generating text and writing assistance, such as proofreading and editing.
3. Translation and language conversion.
4. Summarizing long texts or documents into concise and digestible versions.
5. Offering suggestions and ideas for creative writing, brainstorming, or problem-solving.
6. Providing definitions for words and phrases.
7. Conversing and engaging in natural-sounding dialogue.

These tasks would allow me to utilize my strengths in language understanding and generation, while continuously learning and improving my abilities.


Answered 17 days ago

First step is Discovery of who you are.. You want to identify who you are and what you can bring to the online space..

It's kinda like applying for a job only you have to think of it as your lifestyle..

1. First impression: First impression is everything.. Optimize your profile, Bio, Photography, And what you do..Skills

2. Marketing is the king of all sales: You have to promote you and your story.. You want to get as much targeted traffic as possible and be in front of them... Lets say you are a freelancer or a person that knows how to clean.. Promote you and what you do on all platforms... Tip if you can stretch yourselve 10 people deep.. can have 10 social media platforms or accounts.. You 10X your chances of working with your first client.. It's like applying for 10 jobs... Take the same energy and do whats said above..

3. Have something to offer.. You can not get someone to buy on the first date.. But have something to offer.. Follow up continously until they respond..

4. Rinse and Repeat.. If you get burnt out dont worry we all go through this..


Answered 11 days ago

Your company may keep it simple on day one because they don’t want to bombard you with too much information all at once. While you may not receive a list of long-term goals right away, you should still prepare to be a sponge and absorb as much knowledge as you can. Some things you may learn on your first day of work include:

Company mission, values, and policies

Overview of your role and responsibilities
Tools, logins, and passwords

Team member names and roles

If you aren’t prepared to take in a lot of information on your first day of work, you may have trouble grasping material as the week progresses. It’s easier to retain new concepts once you have the foundation mastered.

Tip: Your first day of work may feel overwhelming, so practice releasing control and letting go of your expectations before you head into the day. That way, you can process new information with an open mind. Try to relax by doing breathing exercises, meditation, or listening to calm music the night before your first day. This will prepare you to be energized and process new information on day one.

Working from home offers more flexibility, but it also means team members rely heavily on tech. The more you know about your new company’s tools and processes before entering the office, the less you’ll have to learn on the job.
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10 TIPS FOR SUCCESS ON YOUR FIRST DAY O ...
10 tips for success on your first day of work

Team Asana contributor image
Team Asana
January 13th, 2024
7 min read
View Templates
Summary
Your first day of work at a new job can be exciting and nerve-wracking. There’s a lot to learn—like what your new coworkers are like and what the team dynamics are. While every workplace is different, you can use a universal set of tips to prepare. In this piece, we outline how to conquer your first day of work and offer guidance for adjusting to a new work environment.

So you’ve secured a new job—score! The hard part is over. With your first day of work approaching, you’re likely feeling excited and nervous. No two workplaces are the same, so as you walk through the office doors or enter your company's online chat room for the first time, try to embrace the uncertainty.

Before the big day arrives, the best thing you can do is adjust your expectations and prepare yourself accordingly. Then, once you’re at work, focus on your introduction and the first impressions you’ll make. Most importantly, remember that your first day of work is an opportunity to learn.

Tips for your first day of work
No matter your role, there are 10 universal tips you can use to have a successful first day of work. It’s normal to have jitters when trying something new, but if you apply the tips below, you’ll start your new position feeling confident and comfortable.

Free new hire checklist template
1. Prepare to learn a lot
Your company may keep it simple on day one because they don’t want to bombard you with too much information all at once. While you may not receive a list of long-term goals right away, you should still prepare to be a sponge and absorb as much knowledge as you can. Some things you may learn on your first day of work include:

Company mission, values, and policies

Overview of your role and responsibilities
Tools, logins, and passwords

Team member names and roles

If you aren’t prepared to take in a lot of information on your first day of work, you may have trouble grasping material as the week progresses. It’s easier to retain new concepts once you have the foundation mastered.

Tip: Your first day of work may feel overwhelming, so practice releasing control and letting go of your expectations before you head into the day. That way, you can process new information with an open mind. Try to relax by doing breathing exercises, meditation, or listening to calm music the night before your first day. This will prepare you to be energized and process new information on day one.

2. Create a list of questions
Creating a list of questions before you arrive for your first day of work can set you up for an informative and productive day. After receiving your offer letter, you’ll likely have many questions running through your head. Make sure you write those questions down, or they might slip your mind once you get to work. The first day can be hectic, so it’s helpful to have questions ready to go for when you have free time.

Some questions you may want to ask the human resources department or fellow team members include:

Who do I report to? Is there an organizational chart I can review?

How will my performance be reviewed? How frequently do we do performance reviews?

What decisions am I in charge of making? What decision making policies, if any, do we have in place? Who are my main stakeholders?

What are the current team dynamics? Which cross-functional teams do we work with most often?

Tip: You may not get a chance to ask all of these questions on your first day, and that's okay. By writing them down and keeping a list, you can get to them when you have dedicated one-on-one time with your manager or mentor. As you onboard, you’ll inevitably have new questions, which you can add to your ongoing list.

3. Get plenty of sleep
You’ve probably heard this tip many times before, but it’s worth repeating. If you don’t get enough sleep before your first day of work, you’ll have trouble focusing, grasping information, and presenting the best version of yourself. Getting between seven and eight hours of sleep per night is the sweet spot. Anything below that can significantly reduce productivity.

A study from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine shows that those who reported getting five to six hours of sleep experienced 19 percent more productivity loss. Additionally, those who got less than five hours of sleep experienced 29 percent more productivity loss.

Tip: To increase your sleep quality before your first day of work, try adjusting your sleep schedule one week in advance. You can also try exercising the day before work so you’re sufficiently tired when bedtime comes. Limiting tech before you hit the sheets can also increase sleep quality.

4. Study company tools
Your team members will appreciate it when you enter the workspace prepared. Every company uses specific tools and programs to operate, and you’ll have a better chance of success if you familiarize yourself with these tools early on.

While some tools may require a paid subscription, many of them offer free trials which will give you an introductory look at what you might experience when using them in the workplace. You may want to study up on tools for:

Communication: Gmail, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Zoom

Project management: Asana

Search engine optimization: Ahrefs, Google Analytics, SEMrush

Time tracking: TimeDoctor, Everhour, TaskBill.io

Customer relationship management: Salesforce, MuleSoft, Zoho CRM

Cloud backup: DropBox, Jira Cloud, BetterCloud

Scheduling: HourStack, Google Calendar

Data analysis and documentation: Microsoft Excel, Google Sheets, Databox

Working from home offers more flexibility, but it also means team members rely heavily on tech. The more you know about your new company’s tools and processes before entering the office, the less you’ll have to learn on the job.

Tip: If you have an effective process or program from a past job role, consider introducing it to your team. The tools you use to manage your team and the projects you work on can have a positive impact on overall performance.

Free new hire checklist template
5. Practice your elevator pitch
Before your first day, practice your elevator pitch so you can give a valuable introduction in the workplace. You may have secured a position with your new employer, but it’s equally important to give this pitch when you meet your team so you can leave a good first impression.

How to give an elevator pitch
The goal of this is to explain who you are, what you offer, and your goals as a leader. Since this is an introduction, you should end your pitch by engaging the listener. That way, your pitch becomes a two-way conversation and also gives them the opportunity to introduce themselves.

Tip: The elevator pitch got its name because you should be able to present all of your information in the time it takes to ride an elevator with someone. Practice your pitch at home the week before your first day of work to get it right. Consider these questions: Who am I? What experience am I bringing to the team? What do I want to help the team accomplish?

6. Get to know your new team
Aside from introducing yourself through an elevator pitch, you should try to get to know your team on a more personal level. We spend one-third of our lives working, so it’s safe to say you’ll spend a lot of time with your new team. Your work life will be much less enjoyable if you don’t get along with them, and it’ll also be harder to accomplish team projects.

Try using icebreaker questions during lunch or break times to get your coworkers talking about themselves and spark conversations. Some ice breaker questions you can as as a new team member include:

Do you have any pets?

What was your first job?

What’s one piece of career advice you would give to a new hire?

What is your current desktop or cell phone wallpaper?

What book are you currently reading?

You can also try playing team building games like two truths and a lie or trivia to encourage your team to work together while learning more about one another.

Tip: Your colleagues will be your best resources for information and support during your time at your new job. These people have similar perspectives on the structure and dynamics of your workplace. Once your title of “new hire” has faded, continue reaching out to others when you need help. You can then offer the same guidance to other newbies one day.

7. Bring positive energy
One way to leave a good first impression is by bringing positive energy on the first day of work. The energy you bring will pave the way for how you handle the rest of your career. Positive energy leads to healthy group dynamics and better opportunities, while negative energy leads to poor relationships and a glass-half-empty mindset.

When you have negative energy, it bleeds into your daily tasks, your meetings, and your work capabilities. Research shows that when you work with a positive mindset, performance on nearly every level—productivity, creativity, engagement—improves.

Tip: Having positive energy doesn’t require an overly upbeat attitude if that isn’t your natural personality. On your first day of work, simply try to relax and smile so your team knows you’re grateful for the position. Nonverbal communication can send the message that you’re unhappy, tired, or frustrated, so be aware of your body language.

8. Show interest in your team
The best way to leave a good first impression on your team members is to show genuine interest in what they do and what they have to say.

Show interest in your team
There are many ways to show interest in your coworkers. Some ways include:

Look them in the eye

Listen when they speak

Ask follow-up questions

Remember things they tell you

Tip: You may have trouble listening because you’re focused on what you plan to say next. This inevitably leads to a less genuine and engaged conversation. Instead, avoid multitasking and practice active listening. Take time during conversations to digest the other person’s words. When you do, the interaction will be more valuable and you’ll likely leave a stronger impression.

Listen and observe
You may receive training materials during your first week so you know how to do your job, but if you want to excel in your role, simply listen and observe. If you work from home, watch how your coworkers interact through content management systems or other applications like Asana.

Observe any processes your team members have in place and mimic their behavior. Listen to the language they use and the topics they discuss during meetings. When you listen, you gain knowledge quickly, which means you can more readily apply that knowledge.
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10 TIPS FOR SUCCESS ON YOUR FIRST DAY O ...
10 tips for success on your first day of work

Team Asana contributor image
Team Asana
January 13th, 2024
7 min read
View Templates
Summary
Your first day of work at a new job can be exciting and nerve-wracking. There’s a lot to learn—like what your new coworkers are like and what the team dynamics are. While every workplace is different, you can use a universal set of tips to prepare. In this piece, we outline how to conquer your first day of work and offer guidance for adjusting to a new work environment.

So you’ve secured a new job—score! The hard part is over. With your first day of work approaching, you’re likely feeling excited and nervous. No two workplaces are the same, so as you walk through the office doors or enter your company's online chat room for the first time, try to embrace the uncertainty.

Before the big day arrives, the best thing you can do is adjust your expectations and prepare yourself accordingly. Then, once you’re at work, focus on your introduction and the first impressions you’ll make. Most importantly, remember that your first day of work is an opportunity to learn.

Tips for your first day of work
No matter your role, there are 10 universal tips you can use to have a successful first day of work. It’s normal to have jitters when trying something new, but if you apply the tips below, you’ll start your new position feeling confident and comfortable.

Free new hire checklist template
1. Prepare to learn a lot
Your company may keep it simple on day one because they don’t want to bombard you with too much information all at once. While you may not receive a list of long-term goals right away, you should still prepare to be a sponge and absorb as much knowledge as you can. Some things you may learn on your first day of work include:

Company mission, values, and policies

Overview of your role and responsibilities
Tools, logins, and passwords

Team member names and roles

If you aren’t prepared to take in a lot of information on your first day of work, you may have trouble grasping material as the week progresses. It’s easier to retain new concepts once you have the foundation mastered.

Tip: Your first day of work may feel overwhelming, so practice releasing control and letting go of your expectations before you head into the day. That way, you can process new information with an open mind. Try to relax by doing breathing exercises, meditation, or listening to calm music the night before your first day. This will prepare you to be energized and process new information on day one.

2. Create a list of questions
Creating a list of questions before you arrive for your first day of work can set you up for an informative and productive day. After receiving your offer letter, you’ll likely have many questions running through your head. Make sure you write those questions down, or they might slip your mind once you get to work. The first day can be hectic, so it’s helpful to have questions ready to go for when you have free time.

Some questions you may want to ask the human resources department or fellow team members include:

Who do I report to? Is there an organizational chart I can review?

How will my performance be reviewed? How frequently do we do performance reviews?

What decisions am I in charge of making? What decision making policies, if any, do we have in place? Who are my main stakeholders?

What are the current team dynamics? Which cross-functional teams do we work with most often?

Tip: You may not get a chance to ask all of these questions on your first day, and that's okay. By writing them down and keeping a list, you can get to them when you have dedicated one-on-one time with your manager or mentor. As you onboard, you’ll inevitably have new questions, which you can add to your ongoing list.

3. Get plenty of sleep
You’ve probably heard this tip many times before, but it’s worth repeating. If you don’t get enough sleep before your first day of work, you’ll have trouble focusing, grasping information, and presenting the best version of yourself. Getting between seven and eight hours of sleep per night is the sweet spot. Anything below that can significantly reduce productivity.

A study from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine shows that those who reported getting five to six hours of sleep experienced 19 percent more productivity loss. Additionally, those who got less than five hours of sleep experienced 29 percent more productivity loss.

Tip: To increase your sleep quality before your first day of work, try adjusting your sleep schedule one week in advance. You can also try exercising the day before work so you’re sufficiently tired when bedtime comes. Limiting tech before you hit the sheets can also increase sleep quality.

4. Study company tools
Your team members will appreciate it when you enter the workspace prepared. Every company uses specific tools and programs to operate, and you’ll have a better chance of success if you familiarize yourself with these tools early on.

While some tools may require a paid subscription, many of them offer free trials which will give you an introductory look at what you might experience when using them in the workplace. You may want to study up on tools for:

Communication: Gmail, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Zoom

Project management: Asana

Search engine optimization: Ahrefs, Google Analytics, SEMrush

Time tracking: TimeDoctor, Everhour, TaskBill.io

Customer relationship management: Salesforce, MuleSoft, Zoho CRM

Cloud backup: DropBox, Jira Cloud, BetterCloud

Scheduling: HourStack, Google Calendar

Data analysis and documentation: Microsoft Excel, Google Sheets, Databox

Working from home offers more flexibility, but it also means team members rely heavily on tech. The more you know about your new company’s tools and processes before entering the office, the less you’ll have to learn on the job.

Tip: If you have an effective process or program from a past job role, consider introducing it to your team. The tools you use to manage your team and the projects you work on can have a positive impact on overall performance.

Free new hire checklist template
5. Practice your elevator pitch
Before your first day, practice your elevator pitch so you can give a valuable introduction in the workplace. You may have secured a position with your new employer, but it’s equally important to give this pitch when you meet your team so you can leave a good first impression.

How to give an elevator pitch
The goal of this is to explain who you are, what you offer, and your goals as a leader. Since this is an introduction, you should end your pitch by engaging the listener. That way, your pitch becomes a two-way conversation and also gives them the opportunity to introduce themselves.

Tip: The elevator pitch got its name because you should be able to present all of your information in the time it takes to ride an elevator with someone. Practice your pitch at home the week before your first day of work to get it right. Consider these questions: Who am I? What experience am I bringing to the team? What do I want to help the team accomplish?

6. Get to know your new team
Aside from introducing yourself through an elevator pitch, you should try to get to know your team on a more personal level. We spend one-third of our lives working, so it’s safe to say you’ll spend a lot of time with your new team. Your work life will be much less enjoyable if you don’t get along with them, and it’ll also be harder to accomplish team projects.

Try using icebreaker questions during lunch or break times to get your coworkers talking about themselves and spark conversations. Some ice breaker questions you can as as a new team member include:

Do you have any pets?

What was your first job?

What’s one piece of career advice you would give to a new hire?

What is your current desktop or cell phone wallpaper?

What book are you currently reading?

You can also try playing team building games like two truths and a lie or trivia to encourage your team to work together while learning more about one another.

Tip: Your colleagues will be your best resources for information and support during your time at your new job. These people have similar perspectives on the structure and dynamics of your workplace. Once your title of “new hire” has faded, continue reaching out to others when you need help. You can then offer the same guidance to other newbies one day.

7. Bring positive energy
One way to leave a good first impression is by bringing positive energy on the first day of work. The energy you bring will pave the way for how you handle the rest of your career. Positive energy leads to healthy group dynamics and better opportunities, while negative energy leads to poor relationships and a glass-half-empty mindset.

When you have negative energy, it bleeds into your daily tasks, your meetings, and your work capabilities. Research shows that when you work with a positive mindset, performance on nearly every level—productivity, creativity, engagement—improves.

Tip: Having positive energy doesn’t require an overly upbeat attitude if that isn’t your natural personality. On your first day of work, simply try to relax and smile so your team knows you’re grateful for the position. Nonverbal communication can send the message that you’re unhappy, tired, or frustrated, so be aware of your body language.

8. Show interest in your team
The best way to leave a good first impression on your team members is to show genuine interest in what they do and what they have to say.

Show interest in your team
There are many ways to show interest in your coworkers. Some ways include:

Look them in the eye

Listen when they speak

Ask follow-up questions

Remember things they tell you

Tip: You may have trouble listening because you’re focused on what you plan to say next. This inevitably leads to a less genuine and engaged conversation. Instead, avoid multitasking and practice active listening. Take time during conversations to digest the other person’s words. When you do, the interaction will be more valuable and you’ll likely leave a stronger impression.

9. Listen and observe
You may receive training materials during your first week so you know how to do your job, but if you want to excel in your role, simply listen and observe. If you work from home, watch how your coworkers interact through content management systems or other applications like Asana.

Observe any processes your team members have in place and mimic their behavior. Listen to the language they use and the topics they discuss during meetings. When you listen, you gain knowledge quickly, which means you can more readily apply that knowledge.

Tip: Don’t be afraid to ask lots of questions during your time in training. If you’re observing a meeting but don’t understand why your team handles things a certain way, find an appropriate time to chime in and clarify, then let them continue.

Use your knowledge
Being a fly on the wall will help you understand how your company functions, but you should also learn through hands-on experience. This is when you can use your past knowledge and build on it for future growth.

If you enter your new job with a solid set of skills, add value to your team by teaching your skills to your team members. As you teach others, you’ll also learn from them. This is how team collaboration flourishes.


Answered 11 days ago

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